Wednesday, October 22, 2014 Login Register  Search

"No lines, No laps, No Lectures" - Karl Dewazien

 Koach Karl's Suggested Reading

Minimize
Author:adminCreated:5/28/2007
Fundamental Soccer Coaching-Koach Karl Dewazien is a United States Soccer Federation “A” Licensed coach. He has dedicated his life to teaching coaches the most efficient way to teach our children. His techniques are both simple and effective and they get results.

During the 2004 spring season, Goldstein (a doctoral student in sports psychology at the University of Maryland) surveyed 340 parents of 8- to 15-year-old youth league soccer players of various skill levels in the Washington area. He found that 52.9 percent of parents reported experiencing anger during a match, mostly toward a referee or their child's own team. Discourteous opponents, hostile remarks or gestures, coaches and illegal play were among other irritants.

Read More »

As parents, we don many hats and play different roles in our children’s lives. We provide for their needs, guide them when they are lost, teach them new skills, become their sources of comfort and support when life gets tough on them, and discipline them when they misbehave. The list seems endless, but there is one thing for certain; all are driven by the intention to give them our best as well as bring out the best in them.

Read More »

An essential ingredient of coaching leadership is the ability of the coach to “pull” his/her athletes through the barriers of stress that accompany the intense work required for successful performance. Of course, we know from our physiology of exercise and training that the discomfort associated with the preparation of the athletes for sustained activity is difficult.

Read More »

U.S. Youth Soccer conducted a “grassroots survey” this past year to try to figure out the relationship between kids and organized soccer. The focus was on learning how parents perceive the value of a soccer experience for their children. The results are rather interesting.

Read More »

Formations and "designated positions" are not appropriate for U6-U8 play Why, do you ask? Because children at this age do not understand, do not have the capacity to grasp the concept of "functionality."

Read More »

I don’t suppose there are too many people, who, if asked what they did during their summer vacation, replied “I coached soccer in North Korea”, but that was my lot during August while visiting the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, as it is officially known. Koryo Tours, my Beijing-based travel company, pride themselves on meeting a challenge, and I think they surpassed themselves by working a coaching session into my itinerary.

Read More »

As Responsible Sports Parents, we try to keep our children's "Emotional Tanks" full. What do we mean by this? A person's "Emotional Tank" is like a car's gas tank. When it's full we can go anywhere we want to; when it's empty we can't go at all.

Read More »

"A doctor has prescribed an ACL playing brace for my U17G to wear when on the pitch"...We just keep having the same thing over and over. I guess parents are willing to sacrifice even the health and well being of their own kids for God only knows what.

Read More »

For parents who want their kids to embrace sports as a path to lifelong fitness and fun, the trend calls for new vigilance. Here are some early-warning signs that your child may be burning out.

Read More »

To better understand the diverse, changing and even conflicting opportunities and responsibilities of coaching, it may be helpful to identify five distinct models of the objective of sports. Although some ideas in these models overlap, each model is premised on a different conception of the objectives and purpose of athletic competition and the role of a coach. Consequently, each model also reflects different priorities and values.

Read More »

"They need constant reinforcement and support," says Johnson, co-author of the parent guide "Don't Tell Me What to Do, Just Send Money." "They never really forge intimate relationships with their peers. ... They don't have judgment. They can't take criticism." What do many of these students have in common? Their parents were over involved in their children's classrooms, usually from an early age. (If you apply this also in their Soccer games –you can see the correlation)

Read More »

A few weeks ago, if you recall, you helped me go over some of my issues in getting my players to lay out their fields, esp. the 1+1 and getting my practices to flow. Just as in being a parent, I find that in coaching, to have better kids, I need to be a better coach (parent).I appreciate the way your '9-Step Practice Routine' helps these players to develop in their minds as well as their bodies. The simplicity of your approach allows them to focus on a simple point and then master it, and I believe it does make everything FUN.

Read More »

One of the reasons we parents encourage our kids to play sports is to hopefully broaden their horizons and to give them additional skills they wouldn’t get otherwise. While having a winning season is great, I consider it a bonus and not the main purpose. Playing sports should be a positive experience, and it should be one that children look forward to each and every season.

Read More »